Crescent Beach, February 2015

28 02 2015

 Today we had an exciting trip to Crescent Beach.

The La Have River was frozen over.

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But the ferry was managing to keep the crossing clear.

BlogA1The sea was a solid layer of ice,

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except for the pack ice on each side of the ferry.

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The ferry dragged itself through the blocks of ice.

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Just getting onto Crescent Beach was quite a feat.

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The sea ice and snow made a solid bank.

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There were loads of tree patterns in the sand

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And ice stalactites.

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It was good to walk on the sand without the fear of falling on the ice.

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The ferry was still keeping the route open as we drove home along the river.

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Lunenburg Winter 2015

15 02 2015

We didn’t have a white Christmas here at Lunenburg, but we’ve seen nothing but the white stuff since the New Year.

Backharbour2The Back Harbour is usually frozen over in the winter, but it seems even more so this year, with the covering of snow on top of the ice.

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It’s difficult to see what is land and what is sea, although you can clearly see the ocean in the background.

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The Polar Prince icebreaker, sits in the ice.

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I have never seen the front harbour frozen like this, since we came here in 2007!

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Hopefully the Blue Nose will sail this summer.

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It doesn’t look as if the lobster boats are going to get to their traps any time soon.

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Some views of the town from the golf course road.

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The famous Fisheries Museum.

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And a different view of the Blue Nose.

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The snow around the town is loaded onto lorries and cleared away, but there are still some big heaps.

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Another

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Every roof and window is like this, I just thought this was pretty.

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More snow heaped at the roadside at St. John’s Church.

Today is another snowy, stormy day, with several more snow days forecast for this week. I really love winter and snow, but it’s so cold that there’s not much we can do outside. It’s even too cold to go skiing!





Cape Split Revisited

26 05 2014

The last time we visited Cape Split, was in October 2012. What a thrill it was to hike this week-end and see the spring flowers. This tree has been left across the track, forcing walkers to limbo dance or skirt around it.

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The forest floor was white with these little white flowers. They had 5 petals and looked a bit like wood anemones, but I can’t find their name.Image

Can anyone help me out? Are they Grass of Parnassus?

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Like the tree across the path, this fallen pine was left to sit in the sky.

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I love the vibrant pink of the Purple Trillium. I think Cape Split must have the most specimens I have seen anywhere.

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There were just masses of plants.

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I photographed this tree last time, but it has now lost one of its huge branches.

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This is called Dutchman’s Breeches.

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Seemingly, the flowers look like little pantaloons (upside down), hanging on a clothes line.

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And of course the violets added colour everywhere.

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At the end of the trail is Cape Split itself. The seagulls seemed to be happy that they were on an island.

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This was the best shot I could get with my little camera, I should have had my other one.

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There was more colour to see as we drove back through Scots Bay.

ImageI remembered, too late, that I was going to look for Ami McKay’s house at Scots Bay. She is the author of ‘The Birth House’ and the book is set in this rural location. I reread this book after my last visit to Cape Split and could imagine the characters as she described them.tbh-newest





Pier 21, Halifax

6 11 2013

It’s a few years since we visited Pier 21 at Halifax.

This was the immigration shed, where about one million immigrants, refugees, war brides, evacuee children and displaced persons entered Canada between 1928 and 1971. It was known as the ‘Gateway to Canada.’

Pier 21 became a National Museum of Canada in 2011.

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Liners docked at a wharf divided into Piers 20, 21, 22 and 23.  Pier 21 had a railway booking office and passenger train sidings for special immigration trains.

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Various posters show how Canada tried to entice new immigrants to Canada, with promises of free land, healthy climate and cheap passages.

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Boat loads of people, disembarked at pier 21, with their few belongings.

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Then had to wait on hard seats until they were processed and admitted into Canada, or rejected and returned to their place of origin.

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The ‘Oceans of Hope’ multimedia presentation takes you on a journey through Pier 21’s history, and presents individual stories and memoirs.

War brides tell how they followed their Canadian husbands to Canada and how they settled, or didn’t, with their new in-laws.

During  WWII, 500,000 military personnel departed from Pier 21 and then came back through it, if they were lucky enough to have survived.

This was the storty of the Walnut, from Estonia.

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But the tale of the St Louis was not so happy.

The MS St Louis was a German liner which made a memorable voyage in 1939, with 937 German Jewish refugees.  The passengers  were denied entry to Cuba, the United States and then Canada, and had to face a journey back to Europe. Historians have estimated that, after their return to Europe, approximately a quarter of the ship’s passengers died in concentration camps.

I have not written about Pier 21 before, as I did not find it a particularly exciting museum. It was not a patch on the Mining Museum at Glace Bay, The Fortress of Louisbourg or Alexander Graham Bell Museum.

Pier 21 invites you to look up your ancestors who arrived here. I didn’t think we had anyone to research.

BUT —-Not so long ago, Jeff received an email from a cousin, telling him how their Grandfather’s brothers had been sent to Canada in 1914. These boys of 13 and 16 years had been at Quarriers Home, just outside Glasgow, after the death of their parents.  They were then sent to Canada on the Hesperian which landed on 14th May 1914.

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These boys were 2 of what became known as the ‘Home Children’, here in Canada. The Quarriers children  went initially to “holding houses” at Belleville and Brockville in Ontario, before dispersing to an often arduous life on farms and homesteads.

At no time during Jeff’s upbringing did he ever hear of these uncles from his father or Grandfather. It’s sad that these boys had no further contact with any of their relatives in Scotland or Ireland. I have read that  the Home children were ashamed of what had happened to them and kept their past hidden from their families in Canada.

It is estimated that 12%, over 4 million, of the Canadian population is a descendant of a Home Child.That is a shocking statistic!

I borrowed a book from the local library about British Home Children – Neither Waif nor Stray, by Perry

http://canadianbritishhomechildren.weebly.com/

Today I received an email saying that this book is free to download!!! It really tells the reader about these Home Children and how they felt about being sent away from everything they knew.

http://canadianbritishhomechildren.weebly.com/perry-snow—neither-waif-nor-stray.html