Cape Split Revisited

26 05 2014

The last time we visited Cape Split, was in October 2012. What a thrill it was to hike this week-end and see the spring flowers. This tree has been left across the track, forcing walkers to limbo dance or skirt around it.

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The forest floor was white with these little white flowers. They had 5 petals and looked a bit like wood anemones, but I can’t find their name.Image

Can anyone help me out? Are they Grass of Parnassus?

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Like the tree across the path, this fallen pine was left to sit in the sky.

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I love the vibrant pink of the Purple Trillium. I think Cape Split must have the most specimens I have seen anywhere.

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There were just masses of plants.

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I photographed this tree last time, but it has now lost one of its huge branches.

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This is called Dutchman’s Breeches.

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Seemingly, the flowers look like little pantaloons (upside down), hanging on a clothes line.

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And of course the violets added colour everywhere.

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At the end of the trail is Cape Split itself. The seagulls seemed to be happy that they were on an island.

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This was the best shot I could get with my little camera, I should have had my other one.

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There was more colour to see as we drove back through Scots Bay.

ImageI remembered, too late, that I was going to look for Ami McKay’s house at Scots Bay. She is the author of ‘The Birth House’ and the book is set in this rural location. I reread this book after my last visit to Cape Split and could imagine the characters as she described them.tbh-newest

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Hiking in Quebec

15 10 2012

I wanted to see the ski resort of Mont Sainte-Anne, not far from Quebec City, so we arranged for one night at the Chateau Mont Sainte-Anne.

We hiked up the ski runs, feeling the heat and a realised we were a bit out of condition.

We passed this picturesque picnic hut for skiers.

And made it to the restaurant at the summit, which wasn’t open. Luckily we’d brought a picnic.

One of theĀ  buildings below is our hotel.

It was cool at the top and a fog hung over the Saint Lawrence.

The next day we moved along to Baie Saint Paul and went to the Grand Jardin National Park.

The scenery en-route was impressive.

We looked up at the summit we planned to climb.

The trails led us up through the forest andĀ  we had to keep stopping to admire the views.

We made it to the top without too much difficulty.

This was one of those special days, that we will remember. I don’t think the photos do justice to the kaleidoscope of colours that assaulted our eyes.

 





A Walk at Hell’s Point, Kingsburg

17 06 2012

The walk around Hell’s Point at Kingsburg is one we often take. It is only an 8 Km walk and is just a short drive from our house, making it convenient for any time of the year.

We usually start at Hirtle’s Beach Car Park and walk through the village of Kingsburg to Kingsburg Road.

From there we head onto the seashore and make our way around the first bay.

We pass this house with the square tower, which was originally a church and was moved 400 Km to this location.

A grassy path leads around the coast.


S0metimes you walk on grass, sometimes rocks.

You can look back across to Rose Head.

Sorry, this photo was taken on a dull day. You continue along the oceanfront towards another house with a square tower.

The public track goes along the edge of the property.

Then past this modern property, which I really like.

You are now on the opposite side of the peninsula from King’s Bay and heading back towards Hirtle’s Beach.

You can see a house in the distance on Beach Hill Road.

This house slightly concerns me.

The cliff face in front is falling away with every big storm.

Perhaps the owner plans to move the house, back from the edge before the inevitable happens..

We pass along the top of the cliff in front of the houses on Beach Hill Road, or, if the tide is out walk along the beach.

Back to car park.


You can see this walk on Google Maps. If it is too short it can be combined with the walk from the car park to Gaff Point and back, making a total of 16 Kms.


https://maps.google.ca/maps/ms?msid=200026895431815569914.00049b3e66c6f2fa06563&msa=0&ll=44.267378,-64.261815&spn=0.001147,0.00284