Long Cove, Port Medway

7 06 2015

Today we walked from Port Medway to Long Cove.

bayjpg

It was good to feel the warmth of the sun after a cold, wet week.

bay-2
There is a little harbour at the end of the dirt road and Long Cove cutting inland.

cove
Wire lobster traps were stacked up on the dock.

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As well as the older styled wooden pots.

pots
Our picnic spot had to be back at the limestone rocks,

rocks
with amazing views.

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Apple and cherry blossom, plus wild azalea and bunch berry flowers, helped to add colour to our hike.apple

These tiger swallowtail butterflies enjoyed the heat of the track.

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The Picton Castle Leaves for the South Pacific

3 11 2012

The Picton Castle has been back home in Lunenburg for the summer, preparing for her next voyage to the South Pacific.

She should have left port 2 weeks ago, but Captain Moreland decided to delay the departure due to the approaching Hurricane Sandy.

The crew were not allowed to lie around.

There was plenty to learn.

Today, friends, family and the people of Lunenburg went along to watch this old very special sailing ship leave. Everyone was busy on deck,

getting the jobs done.

And above decks,

putting all their training into action.

I’m sure this is easier done from the safety of the harbour, rather than at sea.

Everyone gathered to wish the crew a ‘Safe Journey.’

I only found out at the harbourside that Captain Moreland’s and Tammy Sharp’s baby son, Dawson, would be travelling on this trip.

It looks like they might be bringing their son up in the Cook Islands, at least for the next three years.

The sails were unfurled.

The safety boat was moved away for the departure.

Horns hooted, people cheered and applauded as the Picton Castle moved off.

Some had a last look at Lunenburg. The next stop will be Grenada, then through the Panama Canal to the Galapagos Islands, Pitcairn Island, French Polynesia, and then to the Cook Islands.

She is off now on another wonderful adventure. The people of Lunenburg will miss her and all of the lively, friendly, crew.





The Mystery of the Carved Stone in Nova Scotia

27 08 2012

On a recent coastal walk here on the South Shore of Nova Scotia, we came across this interesting rock.

It lies among other boulders and looks as if it has been here for a very long time. But has it, is it an ancient petroglyph or is it a modern carving, done by someone having a bit of fun?

The carved scene is complicated and looks like St George and the Dragon, or some sea serpent, with a knight and horse.

 

It reminded me of photos I have of the Pictish Stones at Aberlemno, in Angus, Scotland.

This stone is carved on both sides. One face is decorated with an elaborate cross flanked by angels while the other shows a hunting scene.

This stone has several Pictish symbols; a serpent, a double disc and z-rod and a mirror and comb.  These Pictish stones date from the 6th to the 9th Century – so they’re very old!

This standing stone below, was in Glenshee near our pottery. It was known as ‘The Parliament Stane’, and was believed to be the place where Scottish Kings held parliament when they were on hunting trips in the Royal Forests in the area. There were no carvings or markings on the stone.

But back to the mystery in Nova Scotia.

I found this site with these photos of petroglyphs at Bedford.

http://www.nsexplore.ca/places/halifax-county/bedford-petroglyphs/

 

These are much shallower markings than the ones on my stone.

 

So, who carved this horse on the stone?

And this knight who has just killed the dragon?

And the creature with two heads?

 

The Mi’kmaq recorded images of people, animals, hunting and fishing. With the arrival of the Europeans, they began to include images of sailing ships, men hunting with muskets, soldiers, Christian altars and churches, and small items like coins and jack-knives.

 

Can anyone solve this mystery for me? Is this a modern day carving or is it an ancient stone, with a meaning?

 

Update – January 24th, 2017

 This post has attracted a lot of interest and comment.

In 2013, the Curator of Archaeology at the Nova Scotia Museum said it had been carved with a metal tool, so was probably done by a local artist.

Then the Director of Studies in History at Yale University said it was a clumsy copy of the Ramsund Carving.

                                                

 It is really very much a copy of this!
I continued to try to find out who had done the carving. Someone thought a local stone mason had carved it, but the name I was given said he had carved stones, but not this one.
Some theories that were voiced in the comments were that it was to do with the Knights Templar and Oak Island, a Memorial stone, the Halifax Chiseller, Rosslyn Chapel …………..
My photos have been copied and posted by someone, stating that this stone was covered in seaweed and seagull droppings, before it was cleaned up – with no photos to support such a claim!
I have tried several times to have a photo printed in the local newspaper, hoping that someone would solve this problem, but that never happened.
Last summer, I had a friend who is a dowser, look at the stone. He was very excited by it and gave me this report.
The runestone is genuine and was created in 1167 during the month of October.
Three men were committed to creating this wonderful original which took them 7 days to complete.
The process used in creating this masterpiece is still a puzzle except that heat was used before the caring as carried out. no chisels were used.
At the period of carving the stone was further inland. However, due to environmental changes, erosion of the coast, the stone was finally situated on the beach. Much of the erosion was caused by ice pushing up against the cliffs in winter periods during the small ice age which finally ended in the late 1800s.
The stone is currently buried to a depth beneath the beach of nearly 3 metres. In other words there is more stone beneath the beach than above it.
There are 6 ley lines ( earth energy lines) crossing the centre of the stone. All are positive- some male others female.
I put my post onto the Local Lunenburg Community Facebook Page and was told that this carving was done in the 1980,s by the nephew of 2 artists who came to the nearby beach cottage for the summer.
Now this is the one story that makes sense to me – no mystery or magic – just someone having fun and leaving their mark on the beach, and causing a good bit of discussion.
I think the mystery of the stone has been solved!




Shark Week in Lockeport, Nova Scotia

17 08 2012

This was meant to be a fishing Blog telling about our trips fishing for mackerel and striped bass.

However, last week-end we headed to Lockeport to fish for mackerel, to find that the local Sea Derby was in progress. We fished for a short time at our usual pier, but nothing was biting, so we went over to the Government wharf to see what was being brought in.

Several fishing boats were waiting to land their catch. This boat above has a long look-out platform for spotting sword fish.

I liked the name of her.

It also has these seats up high for spotting the fish.

Some cod had been landed and were being weighed and measured. There doesn’t seem to be a limit to the size taken, but there is a maximum of 10 rule. I remember when we used to catch huge cod on the West Coast of Scotland in the 70’s, it’s good to see they are returning.

Mackerel are plentiful at this time of the year. We caught 14 one day at Lunenburg and 8 at Lockeport in a very short time.

The Governement body, the Department of Fisheries, was present to check what was being landed.

The shark had to be winched from the boats up into a shed.

Where they were weighed, and measured and the contents of their stomachs examined.

This one weighed about 350lb!

I had never seen a shark up close before. These were Blue Sharks – what a beautiful colour!

We had a very exciting day and might go fishing at the Sea Derby next year.

This Great White Shark was caught in a fisherman’s trap, last year, in the Bay of Fundy. I have taken the photograph from a CBC page. It was a baby female, 3 metres long and weighing 272 Kg.

This was taken from the CBC report of August 17th, 2011.

Steve Campana, head of the Canadian Shark Research Laboratory, said the shark was likely looking for fish when it got trapped.”They’re interested in fish and perhaps small seals and dolphins. It’s very unusual for a great white to attack a person and usually when they do, it’s because they look up and see a surfer on a surfboard and it resembles a seal, which is one of their favourite prey,” said Campana.

He pointed out that in the 1930s there was a shark attack in the area that sunk a boat but left the boaters unharmed. “They’re not interested in people.”

“Canada is within the range of great white habitat, so they’ve undoubtedly been coming up here since time immemorial,” he said. “It’s just that the population of great whites used to be much larger, at least 10 times larger, just 30 years ago than it is now.”

But this Mako, caught in  2004 was a giant!

It was caught by Jamie Doucette, when he was fishing in the Annual Shark Scramble at Yarmouth, NS.

The shark weighed in at an astonishing 1,082 pounds and was a Canadian record.

I’m really not sure what I’d do if I caught any of these huge fish.

There is another Shark Derby on 25th August at the Seafest at Brooklyn, Liverpool. We’ll go along and see if there are any records caught there.





Blue Rocks, kayaking again.

5 07 2012

Today is wet and foggy, but I don’t mind as we have had a really good spell of weather.

Yesterday we took the kayaks down to Blue Rocks, again.

We left Blue Rocks, before 8 am.

 

The sea was like a mill pond, as we headed out beyond these little islands.

This island has 3 houses on it and  is linked to Stonehurst by a  small wooden bridge. I mentioned it in a previous blog about ouhouses.

https://queensincanada.wordpress.com/2009/01/02/canadian-outhouses/

We tried to catch some mackerel for lunch, but no luck.

What is so amazing about Blue Rocks and Stonehurst are these narrow channels, many accessible by kayak only.

It’s like entering another world.

Slabs of rock and stunted trees.We didn’t see any otters on this trip, but there are plenty around – hopefully next time.

We paddled back around to the other side of the little island,

and under the bridge,

back along to Blue Rocks.

I feel so fortunate to have such a place, so close to home,

with exciting paddling, great wildlife, and colourful boat sheds.





Another paddle around Heckman’s Island.

22 08 2011

We had annual rituals when we lived in Scotland.  In May we would cycle from Glen Fearnat down Glen Tilt to Pitlochry and home. Then there was the cycle round Loch Rannoch and yet another trip from Kirriemuir to Edzell and back via Forfar.

Here in Nova Scotia we like to make an annual outing around Heckman’s Island. We can leave from various points, but last week-end we started out from the inlet past the Cranberry Farm.

The weather was perfect. The farm you see is actually at the end of Second Peninsula.

It’s boating season and everyone had their yachts in the water.

Nice reflection.

This deck had a golf cart for some reason! To get from the house to the boat?

There are simple cabins

and permanent homes.


This is the road bridge onto the island. We have to paddle through here and along Tanner’s Pass, between the island and the ‘mainland’.

We stopped for a break at a boat shed we admire. This would make the perfect house site, but the road to it would be impossible.

I am always taking photographs of the rocks around Stonehurst, I find this landscape so amazing.

These cormorants had just been sunning themselves, before flying off. I could have done with a better camera, but am always afraid that my Canon will end up in the water.

We landed on the little beach near the Cranberry Farm.

We’d had a perfect day, watching eagles, ospreys, cormorants, terns, seals and otters. We’ll have to wait until next year to do that trip again.





The Picton Castle Returns to Lunenburg

18 06 2011

It was March 2010, that I watched the Picton Castle sail out of Lunenburg Harbour on her 5th World trip.

She headed to Panama, Ecuador and on to Tahiti and the Cook Islands on the first leg.

Here is a video  I found on youtube of here arriving at the Cook Islands, where she is registered.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gToiyOnZAms

From August until November she sailed to Tonga, Fiji and Bali.

Leg 3 took her from Bali, to Cape Town.   She then sailed from South Africa to Bermuda and back to Lunenburg.

The captain’s log makes interesting reading of this voyage.

http://www.picton-castle.com/captains_log/

Today, the Picton Castle returned to her home port – but I was not in town to watch her sail back!

I walked to the harbour and took these photos.

Most of the crew had left the ship.

The rain wasn’t far away.

Lunenburg was pleased to see her safe return.

She proudly flies the Canadian flag, as well as that of the Cook Islands.

Wouldn’t it be something to travel the world in one of these ships?


This summer you can sail on her to Newfoundland, the most eastern piece of land in North America – as a crew member.

And discover for yourself what life is like aboard.

You will learn everything you need to know about sailing. The trip starts in July and takes 8 weeks. Anyone interested?